Saturday Seminars

K-3 Students & 4-7 Students

Fall Series

“Writing may seem like magic, but it is for us to take our students behind the stage curtain and show them the pigeons being tucked up the magician’s sleeves.” —Donald Murray

For K–3 Grade Writers

Hey, Wonder Writer! Come Workshop with Other Young Writers.

Our writing workshop is a lively space where writers share ideas and learn strategies that they can use in all kinds of writing. Lots of writing happens here, as well as drawing and talking about ideas. We provide positive, creative conditions that invite your child to risk writing at their growing edge. This series is designed to teach the writing process and offer strategies that lift the level of student work. The teacher consultant team, Lorena Lopez and Laura Brown, will guide teachers and students, hoping that even if your child doesn’t already love to write, it may become their new favorite subject.

September 28, 2019

Why Workshop?

Typical school writing involves worksheets and assigned formats and topics. Teachers who lead our workshops know that children want to write expressively, to write stories they’ve imagined or experienced that may be funny, scary, or sad. In workshop, also known as process writing, students learn to write the way real authors do. They can write about what matters most to themselves, share ideas with each other, and imitate the practices of good writers. Parents are invited to an informative and interactive free meeting, Parent University, that parallels what children are doing in writing workshop.

Lorena Lopez and Laura Brown (K-3)

October 19, 2019

How Writing Works from the Inside

Teaching workshop, or process writing, can make writing a joy—work that is not a chore. The workshop model is based on learning to write the way experienced writers do. This writing does not demand correctness or perfection. Students make choices and build independence, then acquire greater skill with writing conventions over time. We encourage and nurture student writing, but another key piece is for you to get on the other side of the desk, doing what we ask students to do. While your child has some educational fun, you are invited to the free Parent University to have fun writing, too. Developing your own writing life is one valuable way to respond to your child’s writing. 

Lorena Lopez and Laura Brown (K-3)

 

November 16, 2019

What Do Writers Talk About?

Writing alongside our students is walking the walk, and we soon find that we also need to talk the talk. How do you talk with children about writing beyond pointing out spelling or punctuation errors? In this session, students will explore some ways writers talk to themselves and to readers to revise drafts. Writers need feedback while developing a story; talk is important in the rehearsal stage for writing and even more so when sharing a first draft. Teachers confer with individual writers or small groups to give students strategies they can use in their next pieces. Our method is to teach the writer, not the writing. Workshop includes wonderful read-aloud picture books, with discussion on the writing moves behind these books, to inspire children to try their hand. You’re invited to join conversations about writing in the free parallel session, Parent University, while your child is in writing workshop.

Lorena Lopez and Laura Brown (K-3)

 

Take the Fall K-3 Series & Save

Register here

For 4rd-5th Grade Writers

Using Drama to Open the Doors to Writing

Jane Gilmore and Arcadia Conrad

Description TBA

While each workshop can stand alone, students and teachers can draw much more meaning from each seminar if they have other seminars to build on. Furthermore, registering for the entire series saves you money and time.

Take the Spring 4-5th Series

Register here

September 28, 2019

Register for K-3 February 9 Seminar

Register here

Why Workshop?

For K–3 Grade Writers

Lorena Lopez and Laura Brown

 

Typical school writing involves worksheets and assigned formats and topics. Teachers who lead our workshops know that children want to write expressively, to write stories they’ve imagined or experienced that may be funny, scary, or sad. In workshop, also known as process writing, students learn to write the way real authors do. They can write about what matters most to themselves, share ideas with each other, and imitate the practices of good writers. Parents are invited to an informative and interactive free meeting, Parent University, that parallels what children are doing in writing workshop.

Take the 4-5th September 28 Seminar

Register here

Using Drama to Open the Doors to Writing

For 4-5 Grade Writers

Jane Gilmore and Arcadia Conrad

TBA

October 19, 2019

Sat sem elementary student

Take the K-3 March 2 Seminar

Register here

How Writing Works from the Inside

For K–3 Grade Writers

Lorena Lopez and Laura Brown

Teaching workshop, or process writing, can make writing a joy—work that is not a chore. The workshop model is based on learning to write the way experienced writers do. This writing does not demand correctness or perfection. Students make choices and build independence, then acquire greater skill with writing conventions over time. We encourage and nurture student writing, but another key piece is for you to get on the other side of the desk, doing what we ask students to do. While your child has some educational fun, you are invited to the free Parent University to have fun writing, too. Developing your own writing life is one valuable way to respond to your child’s writing. 

Take the 4-5th October 19 Seminar

Register here

Using Drama to Open the Doors to Writing

For 4-5 Grade Writers

Jane Gilmore and Arcadia Conrad

TBA

November 16, 2019

Take the K-3 November 16 Seminar

Register here

What Do Writers Talk About?

For K–3 Grade Writers

Laura Brown and Lorena Lopez

Writing alongside our students is walking the walk, and we soon find that we also need to talk the talk. How do you talk with children about writing beyond pointing out spelling or punctuation errors? In this session, students will explore some ways writers talk to themselves and to readers to revise drafts. Writers need feedback while developing a story; talk is important in the rehearsal stage for writing and even more so when sharing a first draft. Teachers confer with individual writers or small groups to give students strategies they can use in their next pieces. Our method is to teach the writer, not the writing. Workshop includes wonderful read-aloud picture books, with discussion on the writing moves behind these books, to inspire children to try their hand. You’re invited to join conversations about writing in the free parallel session, Parent University, while your child is in writing workshop.

Take the 4-5th April 6 Seminar

Register here

Using Drama and Improv Games to Open the Door to Writing

For 4-5 Grade Writers

Jane Gilmore, Co-Director SJAWP

Agenda

Registration Fees

Online

Register online and save!
$30.00 per session $75.00 for all 3 sessions
(Students with free & reduced lunch -- no charge. Email sanjosewritingproject@sjsu.edu for promo code)

Walk In

Walk-in registration, to be paid by cash or check only (no credit cards accepted)
$35.00 per session $75.00 for all 3 sessions.

Location: